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  • TeamTMT: The Student Developers Behind Snow Fighters

    [02.11.20]
    - Kevin McVay

  • Toshima:

    There's a kid who throws a big-ass snowball as their special move. The snowball moves around the screen indefinitely, ignoring the tiles on the screen, but I had to tweak it so that it would only recognize the bottom tiles and bounce off of them. Although it uses the same graphics, the configuration of the collision detection is different, and I think it came out as a good-looking special move.

    Also, there's another character that multiplies for their special move, so I used the controller ID variable setting to prevent snowballs thrown by their alter ego from hitting the character's main "self". I set the controller ID of the snowball to be the same one as the parent object character, and had it ignore collisions with the same controller ID.

    Big Trouble in Little Game Development

    Takimoto:

    This was our first time using this software, and we had been dealing a considerable number of bugs, partly because I built the system in a really "Mickey Mouse job" way until I properly understood the various specs. In terms of graphics, implementing collision detection was problematic, as it was pretty difficult to get a good balance with six pixel-based characters. Since the size of each character in this game is the same for each person, I remember having trouble adjusting the size so that the graphics wouldn't feel weird.

    Toshima:

    As for difficult points, I'd have to say "bug removal". It took quite a while because there were quite a few bugs. In particular, all the characters have different special moves, so there were many bugs there and it was hard to catch them all. For example, using special moves could turn you permanently invincible, or make your character disappear.

    Actually, it was even harder finding the bugs than getting rid of them. I had to play the game with other people to try to figure out how the bugs popped up and why, because I couldn't do anything without knowing what was causing them.

    This has been our interview with TeamTMT. We feel that this could be helpful for those just starting in game development, showing where to start and with what. We hope you find this as informative as we did.

    SnowFighters is set to launch to PC (Steam) this winter. Currently, it only supports two- to four-player matches. The team plans to add single player vs. CPU features, more animations, and improved controls, and are hard at work getting the game finished. For more info on the game's release, etc., be sure to follow them on Twitter at @SnowFightersTMT to keep up with all the latest info.

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