Get the latest Education e-news
 
  • Finding Focus For Your Game Dev Career

    [11.30.17]
    - Kevin Murphy
  • This blog was originally posted on the RetroNeo Games blog page on September 30th, 2017.

    Today I want to share some tips aimed to maybe help focus game developers (or those thinking of getting into it) on worthwhile goals for the various stages they might find themselves at in their careers (or non-careers).

    I want to examine a few situations that the developer themselves may be in, rather than focus on game genres, just to be clear. At each stage I'll look at some worthwhile goals, as well as your challenges, and unique freedoms that you may have.

    Hopefully people will get something useful out of this. Setting goals and focusing is key to success in any aspect of your life, so let's get started!

    I'm a hobbyist

    Let's say, like a lot of modern musicians and indie developers, you have no intention of making game development your career. You finances are stable, and you do what you can in your free time purely for the love of it. You have a half dozen or more abandoned projects because as soon as something becomes boring you move on to the next fun idea. There's nothing wrong with this - it's your hobby! But let's just say that you decide, maybe as a bucket list item, that you want to finish and release a game properly.

    Example Goal: Release a finished game for sale to the world within the next 3 years.

    Challenges: You have limited time to put into development, and this may be further hindered by life things like weddings, vacations, family events, etc. You also have limited expertise and (probably) an environment sparse of other experts to help you out or to playtest your game. You're unlikely to dedicate a whole lot of time to marketing or community management, either.

    Freedoms: You don't need your game to make money (this one is huge). You can make anything you want that will keep you interested (though be careful of feature creep if you actually still want to finish the game). Your ‘deadlines' can be moved (though this can be a disadvantage if you're not disciplined enough to keep the game roughly on track). You may have the spare cash from your day job to pay contract artists, voice actors, modellers, etc, thus vastly upping the quality of your game for little time invested.

    The best advice I think is to choose a game idea small-ish in scope that you can make, that you want to see the light of day, and that you want to give up your free time working on. These considerations are true for most of the people on this list, but especially so for hobbyists. Without peers around you, maybe try to find (or create) game dev meetups in your local area. An example would be The Games Co-Op that I organise each month in Dublin, Ireland. The goal is to give developers a regular date on the calendar that they know they can bring a game build to and get feedback on (a second goal is to network and find others to work with).

    I'm a student

    Students are a funny breed. They often have the loftiest of goals, but are also probably enjoying their college years and don't necessarily see these things as being at odds. I'm not for a second saying that they should not enjoy these years. On the contrary! They should make the most of them and cut down the expectations of what they'll build in college during this time.

    Students often underestimate just how much hard work goes into making a game and how hard it can be to work with other people, especially when it comes to their friends. They should plan their projects accordingly.

    Example Goal: Finish your assignments and get a good grade for them (I wouldn't go any further than this. Don't think of your assignment as being Chapter 1 of your epic action-RPG).

    Challenges: Your ambition can be your undoing. You have other assignments that need your attention but which might be less interesting. Give them all due time! Young students especially will likely have plenty of party nights not working and then plenty of crunch sessions where they're doing inferior/buggy work. You are assigned to work in groups (this is a major one. It's actually an advantage long term as it trains you for real life and work in companies, but for college projects you often can't choose who you work with and necessary skills might be missing from the group. The group will need a leader or there'll be a too-many-chefs situation.) The college probably technically owns anything you create, and if not then you're still sharing ownership with your team mates and you likely haven't signed any contracts, have you?

    There are exceptions to this advice, like if you find yourself in a prodigious wunderkindgroup then maybe you should continue with them post-college, but generally the aim should be to get good grades on assignments, have a portfolio of finished or at least presentable projects, and to graduate as a strong individual. Presume to find some good collaborators and weed out some bad ones. After college maybe start something up with the good ones, but don't presume to finish a particular project ‘after college' with the same team. The members will disperse, get jobs, lose interest, or just not want to work with you again, but they'll all own a piece of whatever you created together. Be prepared to let all those games go, but learn what your strengths were and prepare to build on them later. Remember that game mechanics can't be copyrighted but the characters and assets you created do carry ownership, probably split between the group members. After college, rebuild the fun ideas if you must, but leave behind the names, models, and other assets.

Comments

comments powered by Disqus