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  • Nascence: Reflecting on Game School and Change

    [05.23.13]
    - Kevin Wong
  • [USC Interactive Media Division student Kevin Wong looks back on a memorable trip to GDC, observing the "nascent renaissance" emerging in the field of indie development. This article was originally posted on Wong's blog at kevinjameswong.com]

    I try not to have second thoughts about entering this industry. We're riding the wave of Ludus Florentis, the massive sea change, maybe even movement, that James Portnow predicted three years ago, a term that I'll refer to a lot in this article.

    While as a player of games, I welcome the earthquake of creativity that is shaking up the industry right now, I remain concerned about what that could mean for my career. Right now, more people than ever are entering the game industry, and the old guards of yesterday can not possibly employ all that talent that's flooding out of game schools. Independent developers like the ones I admire seldom look to hire or expand, and the few ones that do rarely seek applicants in design. As the bar to entry lowers, the bar to be competitive inches higher.


    Chelsea Howe's diagram of the factors that contribute to "Ludus Florentis", a phrase that I'll use here to describe what's going on right now in gaming. Click for larger version.

    To be competitive in this world means to make necessary sacrifices, everyone is going to give up a little bit of themselves. I personally, ended my political outspokenness and stopped distance running, two facets of myself that I thought important to who I was. In retrospect, the former won't be missed and the latter was mooted anyway by life in Los Angeles.

    Nonetheless, anyone entering game school can expect to work harder than they ever have in their life. They must expect movement, and must be ready to relocate to get the necessary experience that would fulfill their goals. And challenge, those entering this industry must be ready to confront the stark reality of crunch time, demographic homogenity, limited compensation, family separation, the crossover of social and professional life, and a brief career likely lasting less than a decade.

    But that's barely an issue.

    Maybe I'm being overly idealistic or something like it. To be part of this snapshot of time means that I'm part of a greater whole, and only with the combined creativity of game developers everywhere will we unlock a grand future. Being part of the microcosm of USC Games means that I am intrinsically part of this movement, and that the person I form myself to be in this moment in time will determine the direction of this movement and what the medium will become in the future.

    What happened over the course of my first year at game school has sent me on a journey of my own (sorry), while I'm far from that designer that I want to be, I've already met strange new people from walks of life radically different from my own, I've traveled to the conventions and met the visionaries of the medium that I only dreamed of years ago, I've joined and worked on projects continually pushing the boundaries of what games could be and what they can do for the world.

    And Things Got Strange

    By stepping into unknown territory, I opened myself to the risk of failure. But the finite nature of our existence, and the infinite nature of the unknown, moots success or failure in any professional domain. What really matters are our relationships to the people who are closest to us with whom we share our brief journey through this wilderness. ~Jeff Watson

    I worked on the next iteration of my 2012 game of the year, Reality Ends Here. A message went out that Jeff Watson was opening up an experimental class to design future iterations of the ARG, having received a grant to expand the game that had changed many a freshman's life, connecting them to the friends they would paint the future with. I joined the team as a narrative designer, and was in charge of designing an overarching environmental narrative to create the atmosphere of subversive, self-motivated creativity that the future of entertainment demands from its practitioners.


    A typical Reality Ends Here dev meeting.

    Most of the details about what exactly we did to next year's iteration of Reality Ends Here has to be kept under wraps, because, hey, spoilers, but I will say that working on it reminded me of the necessary constraints that time, manpower, and budget placed on these projects. When we began designing the narrative, we had this grand vision of an epic participatory story involving immersive theater, hundreds of audio-logs, story-rich spaces, fictional characters, and a simulated conflict. We ended up cutting out most of that content to only that which would maintain our laser focus on creating the desirable atmosphere of discovery and excitement that we want to provide to our players. Film school is a rabbit hole taking those who choose to explore it to strange lands of magic and adventure, we want to reinforce that aesthetic with this narrative.

    I have great hope for Reality Ends Here. We made a huge number of fundamental changes to the game and expect to see the payoff in the quality of students that partake in this school. And given my knowledge of some of the plans we have for the game, Reality Ends Here may end up making some great difference in the world as a whole. Keep an eye out for us.

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